African Unification Front
HOME
ORGANOGRAM
AUF IDEOLOGY
AUF LEADERSHIP
AUF ANTHEM
AUF FLAG
AFRICAN CALENDAR
AFRICAN PARLIAMENT
UNITY DOCUMENTS
SOVEREIGN RIGHTS
AU INSTITUTIONS
AU-INT'L RELATIONS
HUMAN RIGHTS
PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT
LANGUAGE POLICY
BORDERS
DIASPORA
AFRICAN LAW
COMMUNITY
LAND REFORM
WATER ISSUES
OCEANOGRAPH
CONFLICT
DEFENSE POLICY
HEALTH & SAFETY
FOOD POLICY
SHELTER
ECONOMY
INDUSTRY
TECHNOLOGY
ENERGY & POWER
ECOLOGY FRONT
WILDLIFE POLICY
HERITAGE
EDUCATION
RELIGION
ART & CULTURE
MEDIA & PRESS
QUOTATIONS
AUF CONTACTS
BIOGRAPHIES
GLOSSARY OF TERMS
RELATED LINKS
FAQ
BECOME A MEMBER |
 FEEDBACK |  URGENT ACTION ALERT 

Convention between Great Britain and Morocco relative to a Loan to be raised in London by Morocco, signed at Tangier, 24 October 1861

[Ratification exchanged at Tangier, December 20,1861.]

HIS Majesty the Emperor of Morocco being desirous of raising a loan of £426,000, in London, to enable him to meet his engagements with Her Catholic Majesty, and having requested the good offices of Her Majesty the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, with a view to facilitate that object, and Her Britannic Majesty having agreed to the request of His Imperial Majesty, their Majesties have resolved to conclude a Convention on the subject, and have named as their Plenipotentiaries, that is to say:

Her Majesty the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, John Hay Drummond Hay, Esquire, Companion of the Most Honourable Order of the Bath, Her Minister Resident at the Court of His Majesty the Sultan of Morocco;

And his Majesty the Sultan of Morocco, his officer the learned Fakee Seed Hadj Abderrahman el Ajee;

Who, after having communicated to each other their respective full powers, have agreed upon and concluded the following Articles:

Art. I. His Majesty the Emperor of Morocco engages that from and after the ratification of the present convention there shall be paid over to a Commissioner named by Her Britannic Majesty 50 per cent. of the Customs duties at all the ports of the Empire of Morocco.

Her Britannic Majesty, on her part, engages that 6 weeks before the period at which the half-yearly charge on the loan of £426,000, which the Emperor of Morocco is about to raise, shall become due, she will transfer to the agent or agents of the contractors for that Loan, the sums so to be received by the commissioner of Her Majesty, or so much thereof as may be sufficient to pay the interest and sinking fund on the said Loan, the amount of such sums not exceeding in the aggregate 15 per cent. on the above-mentioned sum of £426,000. But Her Britannic Majesty shall not be liable for the payment of more than she receives.

In case the sums received should be more than sufficient for such half-yearly payments, the surplus all be repaid by the British Commissioner to the officers of the Emperor of Morocco, duly authorized to receive the same.

II. When, by means of the payment provided for in the preceding Article, the whole of the loan of £426,000 shall have been repaid, together with the interest due thereon, the Commissioner of Her Britannic Majesty shall cease to receive the 50 per cent. of the Custom duties at the ports above mentioned, and shall repay to the said officers of the Emperor of Morocco any balance that may be remaining in his hands.

III. The present convention shall be ratified by Her Majesty the Queen of Great Britain and Ireland, and by His Majesty the Emperor of Morocco, and the ratification shall be exchanged at Tangier as soon a possible within 40 days from the date hereof.

In witness whereof the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed the present convention, and have affixed thereto their respective seals.

Done at Tangier, the 24th day of October, in the year 1861, corresponding to the Moorish date of the 18th day of the month of Rabbea the 2nd, in the year 1278.

(L.S.) J. H. DRUMMOND HAY. (L.S.) HADJ ABDERRAHMAN EL AJEE (Arabic signature)

SUPPLEMENTARY CONVENTION between Great Britain and Morocco, relative to a Loan to be raised in London by the Emperor. Signed, in English and Arabic, at Tangier, January 18, 1862.

[Ratifications exchanged at Tangier, February 19,1862.]

Her Majesty the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland having Concluded a Convention with His Majesty the Emperor of Morocco, at Tangier, on the 24th day of October, 1861, corresponding, to the Moorish date of the 18th of the month of Rabeea the Second, in the year 1278, for the purpose of facilitating the raising in London, by His Majesty the Emperor of Morocco, of a loan of £426,000, in order to enable him to meet his engagements with Her Catholic Majesty; and whereas it is proposed that the said sum of £426,000 shall be raised at the rate of £85 cash for each £100 stock, whereby the nominal amount of the loan will become £501,176 10s; and doubts having been entertained whether the arrangements of the said Convention for the repayment of the loan extend to an amount of stock greater than the sum of £426,000, intended to be raised in cash; Her Britannic Majesty and His Majesty the Emperor of Morocco have resolved to conclude a further Convention on the subject, and have named as their Plenipotentiaries, that is to say:

Her Majesty the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, John Hay Drummond Hay, Esquire, Companion of the Most Honourable order of the Bath, Her Minister Resident at the Court of His Majesty the Emperor of Morocco;

And His Majesty the Emperor of Morocco, his Officer, the learned Fakee Seed Hadj Abderrahman el Ajee;

Who, after having communicated to each other their respective full powers, have agreed upon and concluded the following Articles:

Art. I. His Majesty the Emperor of Morocco engages that the arrangements of the said Convention so entered into as aforesaid shall apply, not only to the sum of £426,000, intended to be raised in cash, or to so much thereof as shall be raised, but shall extend to the sum of £501,1761 10s, being the amount of the stock proposed to be created to raise the said loan, or to such other amount of amount of stock greater than the sum of £501,176 10s, which it may be necessary to create in order to cover and include any discount, bonus, or other consideration which the Commissioner of His said Majesty may, with the concurrence and sanction of His said Majesty, allow to the subscribers to the said loan.

II. The Commissioner of Her Britannic Majesty mentioned in the convention aforesaid shall, by virtue of the said Convention, continue to receive the 50 per cent. of the Customs duties at all the ports of the Empire of Morocco, until not only the said sum of £426,000 sterling and interest thereon, but until also the amount of stock representing that sum, and any discount, bonus, or other consideration to be allowed to the subscribers to the said loan, as provided in the preceding article, shall have been fully paid.

III. In case only a part of the £426,000 cash should be raised then the stipulations of Articles I and II shall apply only to the corresponding amount of stock.

IV. The present Convention shall be ratified by Her Majesty the Queen of Great Britain and Ireland, and by His Majesty the Emperor of Morocco, and the ratifications shall be exchanged at Tangier as soon a possible, within 60 days from the date hereof.

In witness whereof the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed the present convention, and have affixed thereto their respective seals.

Done at Tangier, the 18th day of January, in the year 1862, corresponding to the Moorish date of the 17th of Rejeb, in the Year 1278

(L.S.) J. H. DRUMMOND HAY. (L.S.) HADJ ABDERRAHMAN EL AJEE (Arabic signature)

Text from: Hertslet's Commercial Treaties, vol. XI, p. 425 Also in British and Foreign State Papers, vol. LI, 61. Parliamentary Papers, 1862, vol. LXIV, 453 Martens, Nouveau Recueil General, vol. XVII(2), 132, Archives Diplomatiques, 1862, vol. II, 181 (French translation).

Convention of 18 January 1862 Text from Hertslet's Commercial Treaties, vol. XI, p. 426 Also in British and Foreign State Papers, Vol. LII, 33


British Order in Council, for the regulation of British Consular Jurisdiction in Morocco. Osborne, February 4, 1875

At the Court at Osborne House, Isle of Wight, the 4th day of February, 1875.

PRESENT: THE QUEEN'S MOST EXCELLENT MAJESTY IN COUNCIL

WHEREAS by the General Treaty made between Her Majesty the Queen and the Sultan of Morocco, on the 9th day of December, 1856, it is agreed (among other things) to the effect following (Article XIV), that in all criminal cases, differences, disputes, or other causes of litigation arising between British subjects and the subjects or citizens of other foreign nations, no Moorish authority shall have a right to interfere unless a Moorish subject has received thereby injury to his person or property, in which case the Moorish authority or one of his officers, shall have a right to be present at the tribunal of the Consul; such cases shall be decided solely in the tribunals of the foreign Consuls, without the interference of the Moorish Government, according to the established usages which had theretofore been acted upon, or might thereafter be arranged between such Consuls:

And whereas it seems to Her Majesty the Queen in Council expedient to make provision for the effectual exercise of the jurisdiction in the said Article mentioned:

Now, therefore, Her Majesty the Queen in Council, by virtue and in exercise of the powers in this behalf by the Foreign Jurisdiction Acts, or otherwise, in Her Majesty vested, is pleased, by and with the advice of Her Privy Council, to order, and it is hereby ordered, as follows:

I. In either of the following cases (that is to say) where,

(1.) A subject or citizen of or person enjoying the protection of a State in amity with Her Majesty the Queen other than Morocco (in this Order referred to as a foreigner) desires to institute or take before Her Majesty's Consul a suit or proceeding of a civil nature against a British subject, or he has, before the passing of this Order, instituted or taken such a suit or proceeding, and the same is then pending; or,

(2.) A British subject desires to institute or take before Her Majesty's Consul a suit or proceeding of a civil nature against a foreigner, or he has, before the passing of this Order, instituted or taken such a suit or proceeding, and the same is then pending:

The Consul shall entertain the suit or proceeding, and shall hear and determine it.

Provided, that the Consul shall not proceed therein unless and until the foreigner obtains and files in the Court of the Consul, the consent, in writing, of the competent authority of the foreigner's own nation to his submitting, and does submit, to the jurisdiction of the Consul, and, if required by the Consul, give security, to the satisfaction of the Consul, by deposit or otherwise, to pay fees, damages, costs, and expenses, and abide by and perform the decision of the Consul subject to the right of appeal.

II. Article X (relating to appeals) of the Order in Council regulating Consular Jurisdiction in Morocco, dated the 27th day of August, 1857, and all other provisions of that Order relating to civil suits and proceedings, shall extend and apply to suits and proceedings within this Order, and this Order hall (as far as may be) be read as one with the Order of the 27th day of August, 1857.

III. Nothing in this Order shall prejudicially affect the lawfulness or validity of any Order or thing made or done by any of Her Majesty's Consuls before the passing of this Order; and every such Order and thing shall be as lawful and valid, and may be enforced and acted on, in like manner in all respects, as if this Order had not been made.

And the Right Honourable the Earl of Derby, one of Her Majesty's Principal Secretaries of State, is to give the necessary directions herein given.

ARTHUR HELPS.

Text from Hertslet's Commercial Treaties Vol XIV, 413-4.



Declaration Between the Governments of France and Spain, Respecting the Integrity of Morocco

Signed at Paris, October 3, 1904.

The Government of the French Republic and the Government of His Majesty, the King of Spain, having agreed to define the extent of the rights and the guarantee of the interests resulting, for France, from her Algerian possessions, and, for Spain, from her possessions along the coast of Morocco, and the Government of His Majesty. The King of Spain, having in consequence given its approval to the Anglo-French declaration of April 8, 1904, relating to Morocco and to Egypt, and communicated to it by the Government of the French Republic,

Declare that they remain firmly committed to the integrity of the Moroccan Empire under the sovereignty of the Sultan.

In consequence of this, the undersigned, his excellency the minister for Foreign Affairs, and his excellency, the Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of His Majesty the King of Spain, to the President of the French Republic, duly authorized to this effect, have prepared this present declaration, which they have vested with their seals.

Done at Paris, in duplicate form, October 3, 1904.

[L.S.] DELCASSÉ ; (L.S.) F. DE LEON Y CASTILLO.

TEXT FROM Supplement to American Journal of International Law vol 6, 1912, 30. Also in Archives Diplomatiques, Vol. 96, p. 677.


    


Declaration Between the United Kingdom and France Respecting Egypt and Morocco, Together with the Secret Articles Signed at the Same Time

Signed at London, April 8, 1904.
ARTICLE I.
His Britannic Majesty's Government declare that they have no intention of altering the political status of Egypt.

The Government of the French Republic, for their part, declare that they will not obstruct the action of Great Britain in that country by asking that a limit of time be fixed for the British occupation or in any other manner, and that they give their assent to the draft Khedivial decree
annexed to the present arrangement, containing the guarantees considered necessary for the
protection of the interests of the Egyptian bondholders, on the condition that, after its
promulgation, it cannot be modified in any way without the consent of the Powers signatory of the Convention of London of 1885.

It is agreed that the post of Director-General of Antiquities in Egypt shall continue, as in
the past, to be entrusted to a French savant.

The French schools in Egypt shall continue to enjoy the same liberty as in the past.

ARTICLE II.
The Government of the French Republic declare that they have no intention of altering the
political status of Morocco.

His Britannic Majesty's government, for their part, recognize that it appertains to France,
more particularly as a Power whose dominions are coterminous for a great distance with those of
Morocco, to preserve order in that country, and to provide assistance for the purpose of all
administrative, economic, financial, and military reforms which it may require. They declare
that they will not obstruct the action taken by France for this purpose, provided that such action
shall leave intact the rights which Great Britain, in virtue of treaties, conventions, and usage,
enjoys in Morocco, including the right of coasting trade between the port of Morocco, enjoyed by
British vessels since 1901.

ARTICLE III.
His Britannic Majesty's Government, for their part, will respect the rights which France, in
virtue of treaties, conventions, and usage, enjoys in Egypt, including the right of coasting trade
between Egyptian ports accorded to French vessels.

ARTICLE IV.
The two governments, being equally attached to the principle of commercial liberty both in
Egypt and Morocco, declare that they will not, in those countries, countenance any inequality
either in the imposition of customs duties or other taxes, or of railway transport charges.

The trade of both nations with Morocco and with Egypt shall enjoy the same treatment in
transit through the French and British possessions in Africa. An agreement between the two
governments shall settle the conditions of such transit and shall determine the points of entry.

This mutual engagement shall be binding for a period of thirty years. Unless this
stipulation is expressly denounced at least one year in advance, the period shall he extended for
five years at a time.

Nevertheless, the Government of the French Republic reserve to themselves in Morocco,
and His Britannic Majesty's Government reserve to themselves in Egypt, the right to see that the
concessions for roads, railways, ports, &c., are only granted on such conditions as will maintain
intact the authority of the state over these great undertakings of public interest.

ARTICLE V.
His Britannic Majesty's Government declare that they will use their influence in order that
the French officials in the Egyptian service may not be placed under conditions less advantageous
than those applying to the British officials in the same service.

The Government of the French Republic, for their part, would make no objection to the
application of analogous conditions to British officials now in the Moorish service.

ARTICLE VI.
In order to ensure the free passage of the Suez Canal, His Britannic Majesty's Government
declare that they adhere to the stipulations of the treaty of the 29th October, 1888, and that they
agree to their being put in force. The free passage of the canal being thus guaranteed, the
execution of the last sentence of paragraph 1 as well as of paragraph 2 of Article 8 of that treaty
will remain in abeyance.

ARTICLE VII.
In order to secure the free passage of the Straits [sic] of Gibraltar, the two governments
agree not to permit the erection of any fortifications or strategic works on that portion of the
coast of Morocco comprised between, but not including, Melilla and the heights which command
the right bank of the river Sebou.

This condition does not, however, apply to the places at present in the occupation of
Spain on the Moorish coast of the Mediterranean.

ARTICLE VIII.

The two governments, inspired by their feeling of sincere friendship for Spain, take into
special consideration the interests which that country derives from her geographical position and
from her territorial possessions on the Moorish coast of the Mediterranean. In regard to these
interests the French Government will come to an understanding with the Spanish Government.

The agreement which may be come to on the subject between France and Spain shall be
communicated to His Britannic Majesty's Government.

ARTICLE IX.
The two governments agree to afford to one another their diplomatic support, in order to
obtain the execution of the clauses of the present declaration regarding Egypt and Morocco.

In witness whereof his excellency the Ambassador of the French Republic at the Court of
His Majesty the King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and of the British
Dominions beyond the Seas, Emperor of India, and His Majesty's Principal Secretary of State for
Foreign Affairs, duly authorized for that purpose, have signed the present declaration and have
affixed thereto their seals.

Done at London, in duplicate, the 8th day of April, 1904.
( L. S. ) LANSDOWNE.
( L. S. ) PAUL CAMBON.

Secret Articles

ARTICLE I.
In the event of either government finding themselves constrained, by the force of
circumstances, to modify their policy in respect to Egypt or Morocco, the engagements which
they have undertaken towards each other by Articles 4, 6, and 7 of the declaration of to-day's date
would remain intact.

ARTICLE II.
His Britannic Majesty's Government have no present intention of proposing to the Powers
any changes in the system of the Capitulations, or in the judicial organization of Egypt.

In the event of their considering it desirable to introduce in Egypt reforms tending to
assimilate the Egyptian legislative system to that in force in other civilized countries, the
Government of the French Republic will not refuse to entertain any such proposals, on the
understanding that His Britannic Majesty's Government will agree to entertain the suggestions
that the Government of the French Republic may have to make to them with a view of introducing
similar reforms in Morocco.

ARTICLE III.
The two governments agree that a certain extent of Moorish territory adjacent to Melilla,
Ceuta, and other pr‚sides should, whenever the Sultan ceases to exercise authority over it, come
within the sphere of influence of Spain, and that the administration of the coast of Melilla , as far
as, but not including, the heights on the right bank of the Sebou shall be entrusted to Spain.

Nevertheless, Spain would previously have to give her formal assent to the provisions of
Articles 4 and of the declaration of to-day's date, and undertake to carry them out.

She would also have to undertake not to alienate the whole, or a part, of the territories
placed under her authority or in her sphere of influence.

ARTICLE IV.

If Spain, when invited to assent to the provisions of the preceding article, should think
proper to decline, the arrangement between France and Great Britain, as embodied in the
declaration of to-day's date, would be none the less at once applicable.

ARTICLE V.
Should the consent of the other Powers to the draft decree mentioned in Article 1 of the
declaration of to-day's date not be obtainable, the Government of the French Republic will not
oppose the repayment at par of the guaranteed, privileged, and unified debts after the 15th July,
1910.
Done at London, in duplicate, the 8th day of April, 1904.
(L S.) LANSDOWNE.
(L. S.) PAUL CAMBON.

TEXT
Great Britain Treaty Series, No. 24, 1911. -
This declaration, without the secret articles, is published in the SUPPLEMENT (Vol. I, p. 6)
Reprinted "for ready reference in connection with the secret articles now made public." in
American Journal of International Law vol 16, 1912, 26ff
(The text of the draft Khedivial decree referred to in Article 1 of the main treaty is in
Parliamentary Papers "Treaty series, No. 6 (1905)." (Cd. 2384.))


    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    

 Search:
 
 
 Today's Date: January 18, 2020
 On the Policy Front
 ·  Mbeki Should Reconsider Decision to Relocate African Parliament
 ·  The History of Parliament in Ancient Africa
 ·  The Architecture of Peace and Security in the African Union
 ·  "Lift Every Voice" is the Best Anthem for the African Union
 ·  Sheba is the Right Name for Single African Currency
 ·  AU-EU Relations: Neocolonialism is 50 Years Old
 ·  AUF Wants Moratorium on Weapons Trade in the African Union
More...











  
  
  
 
  
  
  
 
  
  
  
 

 
NTONDELE | ASANTE SANA | AMESEGENALO | NA GODE | JERE JEF | NGIYABONGA

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
© AUF. All Rights Reserved.

Portal Design by Dreamsparrow Consulting, Inc.