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DIAMOND INDUSTRY POSES SECURITY RISK TO CANADA
CONCERN ABOUT CRIMINAL LINKS IN DIAMOND TRADE

The Canadian Security Intelligence Service warned that the Canadian diamond industry was on the verge of becoming "tainted by the sort of bloody conflict and disturbing corruption seen in the illicit African gem trade."... "The CSIS report indicates the serious problems that have plagued the African diamond industry in recent years could foreshadow similar difficulties for Canada."

In a story by Vancouver Sun Reporter Jim Bronskill (Sept.4, 2001), titled "CSIS Warns of Crime, Corruption in Canada's Diamond Fields", he reveals that the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and Canada's lead intelligence agency, CSIS, released a declassified version of the secret report, Crime in the African Diamond Industry - Implications for Canada in February 2001 warning that "the problems that have plagued the African diamond industry, including violence", were beginning to impact Canada.

"With this comes the potential for corruption and infiltration by transnational criminal elements, which in turn could pose serious threats to the stability of the northern regions and consequently Canada's national security," says the CSIS report.

When the massive arctic mines, Ekati and Diavik, become fully operational, Canada could generate as much as 12.5% of the world revenue in diamonds, just behind the African Union and Russia. The Ekati mine which opened three years ago, produces $1 million worth of high-quality diamonds a day. But even this early in its infancy, the Canadian diamond industry has already become associated with trouble from organized crime rings involved in weapons and drug smuggling.

Canadian lawmakers are responding to the concerns surrounding the industry. In the fall of 2001 federal Liberal MP David Pratt will table a private member's bill that will outlaw the sale of conflict diamonds in Canada. It is one of numerous iniatives around the world aimed at stamping out the dioscredited trade.

The CSIS report also noted that Canada accounts for 30% of the world investment in African mining, and Canadian companies "continue to launch key exploration projects in conflict areas of Africa," including Angola and the DRC. Another troubling trend is the use of private security firms who employ mercenaries and soldiers of fortune to protect mining interests - an industry that is "increasingly difficult to monitor."     





    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    

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 Today's Date: August 19, 2019
 On the Policy Front
 ·  Mbeki Should Reconsider Decision to Relocate African Parliament
 ·  The History of Parliament in Ancient Africa
 ·  The Architecture of Peace and Security in the African Union
 ·  "Lift Every Voice" is the Best Anthem for the African Union
 ·  Sheba is the Right Name for Single African Currency
 ·  AU-EU Relations: Neocolonialism is 50 Years Old
 ·  AUF Wants Moratorium on Weapons Trade in the African Union
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